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Image of text: Taking the Challenge and Making a Difference: Launching Evidence-Based Information to Action

Hilton El Conquistador Golf & Tennis Resort in Tucson, Arizona

Convention plans are shaping up!  Events include
Exhibitors, Friday Happy Hour, the Praxis Bowl and the Silent Auction (don’t forget your checkbook or cash!)

 

ArSHA's 2016 Annual Convention

  • Presentations
  • Handouts
  • Fees
  • Accommodations
  • Honors & Awards

Download the Onsite Program!

Multi-Interest


2016 Convention - Multi-Interest

  • Split Brain Research: A Personal Perspective +

    Friday, April 29
    08:00 am - 08:45 am / Session 01

    Multi-Interest

    Frank Musiek, PhD, CCC-A
    Level of Instruction: Introductory   -   Tuquoise I & II

    Split brain research has perhaps impacted our knowledge of the brain as much as any category of research over the past 50 plus years. With advances in controlling seizure disorder commissurotomy surgeries have dwindled and split brain investigations have almost stopped. It seems appropriate to review the some of the many advances brought to us by this unique kind of research. This presentation will provide a personal perspective of the speaker who was on the research team at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center when the commissurotomy procedure was reintroduced in the late 1970's and 1980s. A history of split brain research will be reviewed highlighting key advances and the people behind these advances. Also provided will be a "behind the scenes" look at this amazing time in neurological surgery and research. In addition, a perspective on how this research which likely lead to Roger Sperry's Nobel prize was viewed by patients, medicine and scientists.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to discuss the history of split brain research, outline key advances in brain research resulting from commissurotomy surgery and discuss the rationale for split brain surgery.

  • Socially Thinking - Practically Speaking: The Social Mind at Work and Play - Part 1 +

    Saturday, April 30
    9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
    Multi-Interest

    Session 26
     
    Pamela Crooke, PhD, CCC-SLP

    Level of Instruction - Introductory - Turquoise I & II

    Is it still enough to simply infuse and model good social "skills" in our classrooms?  After all, generations of students have mastered the social world without a specialized social (or emotional) curriculum. Interestingly, administrators, teachers and staff are reporting a spiral downward in the baseline skills of students entering into schools around the globe – both in general and special education settings. Surviving the boring moment, suppressing the blurt, and knowing how to join the group should be considered as critical for success in school as language arts and math. But we aren’t there yet.  The educational standards, when viewed with the right lens, provide a pathway for justifying targeted strategies for those students who excel in their science smarts, but struggle with social smarts. In this brief talk we will explore why it’s not enough to simply teach social rules and basic skills for some individuals with social learning issues. Instead, many of our students need a deeper reason for why we are all expected to use social skills and share physical space effectively. We will explore hands-on activities for tackling the skill, as well as the thinking. The Social Thinking® methodology is an evidence based practice that allows for exploration of the basic underpinnings of the social mind, while providing ideas for teaching common sense strategies for negotiating the ever-changing social world.  Skills needed by ALL students not only in achieving academic success, but also for success in adulthood and life in general.

  • Socially Thinking - Practically Speaking: The Social Mind at Work and Play - Part 2 +

    Saturday, April 30
    11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
    Multi-Interest

    Session 32

    Pamela Crooke, PhD, CCC-SLP

    Level of Instruction - Introductory - Turquoise I & II

    Is it still enough to simply infuse and model good social "skills" in our classrooms?  After all, generations of students have mastered the social world without a specialized social (or emotional) curriculum. Interestingly, administrators, teachers and staff are reporting a spiral downward in the baseline skills of students entering into schools around the globe – both in general and special education settings. Surviving the boring moment, suppressing the blurt, and knowing how to join the group should be considered as critical for success in school as language arts and math. But we aren’t there yet.  The educational standards, when viewed with the right lens, provide a pathway for justifying targeted strategies for those students who excel in their science smarts, but struggle with social smarts. In this brief talk we will explore why it’s not enough to simply teach social rules and basic skills for some individuals with social learning issues. Instead, many of our students need a deeper reason for why we are all expected to use social skills and share physical space effectively. We will explore hands-on activities for tackling the skill, as well as the thinking. The Social Thinking® methodology is an evidence based practice that allows for exploration of the basic underpinnings of the social mind, while providing ideas for teaching common sense strategies for negotiating the ever-changing social world.  Skills needed by ALL students not only in achieving academic success, but also for success in adulthood and life in general.

  • Living Better Through Assistive Technology +

    Click to download handout

    Friday, April 29
    11:00 am - 12:30 pm / Session 09

    Multi-Interest

    Heidi Lervik, MA
    Level of Instruction: Introductory   -   Joshua Tree II

    Speech Language Pathologists and Audiologists often struggle to determine which assistive technology would best meet their patients’ needs.  Speech and Hearing professionals spend valuable time researching equipment options which, in turn, limits important clinical time with the patient.  Additionally, many patients purchase expensive equipment which is often unused or abandoned.   AzTAP aims to address these issues by providing resources, demonstrations and complimentary loaner equipment.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the nine categories of technology AzTAP provides, appropriately refer patients for AzTAP services and identify the two types of financial resources AzTAP provides.

  • Recruitment and Retention of Related Service Providers in Arizona™ Schools +

    Friday, April 29
    11:00 am - 12:30 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 10

    Catherine Bacon, MA, CCC-SLP; Jennine Davidson, MEd
    Level of Instruction: Introductory   -   Joshua Tree I

    A Community of Practice has been recently formed to address the shortage of Speech Language Pathologists in Arizonas schools. This group of stakeholders includes representation from the Arizona Department of Education/Exceptional Student Services, institutions of higher education (including NAU, U of A, ASU, Midwestern, and Estrella Community College), public education agencies, local and national professional organizations, students, and parents who are all collaborating to improve recruitment and retention of speech, occupational and physical therapists for our Arizona Schools. This presentation will provide updates on the activities of the group and plan for the community of practice to begin to develop solutions to address speech/language, occupational and physical therapy services in schools across the state of Arizona.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the challenges in recruitment and retention of SLPs, OTs, and PTs to Arizona schools, describe how professionals, parents, teachers, and administrators can join the Community of Practice on the recruitment and retention of related service providers and list possible solutions to address the shortage of speech/language services in the schools.

  • Behavioral Challenges and Children With Language Impairment +

    Friday, April 29
    01:30 pm - 03:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 12

    Coronado I

    Kasey Chandler, PhD, NCSP

    Language is the number one vehicle for children to access their wants and needs as well as engage in social interaction. Impaired language disrupts one’s ability to effectively interact with peers and adults and establish relationships on all levels. Research has established a positive correlation between language skills and behavioral regulation in children. Communication and behavior disorders are common comorbid conditions. In fact, it is not uncommon for children with emotional disabilities and learning disabilities to have language delay in early childhood. Moreover, all children with autism have communication challenges. Many language impaired children have communication challenges throughout elementary and middle school years. Language services are often dismissed when children reach high school age. Speech/language pathologists are the psychoeducational team members charged with the task of evaluating and intervening with dysfunctional communicators; however these language impaired children are complex beings often requiring behavioral intervention as well. The flip side of this dilemma is that psychologists and behavioral specialists who intervene with maladaptive behaviors of children may miss critical sources of the behavior if the nuances of the child’s communication challenges are overlooked. Inclusion of the SLP in the process of conducting a functional behavior assessment is critical in determining the source of maladaptive behavior in many children. SLP expertise is also critical in the process of developing an effective behavioral support plan. Collaborative efforts from all team members supporting behaviorally dysregulated children are imperative in developing effective interventions.

    Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to identify comorbid disorders with language impairment in children, identify steps to developing a functional behavior assessment for behavioral dysregulated children with communication impairment and identify interventions to support behavioral regulation in language impaired children.

  • AAC in the Borderlands: What We Need to Know +

    Friday, April 29
    01:30 pm - 03:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 13

    Sharon Hendrickson-Pfeil, MeD, CCC-SLP
    Level of Instruction: Intermediate  -  Agave Ballroom

    This is a clinical presentation focusing upon AAC services provided to Spanish-speking children and adults in Arizona. The field as it applies this population is reviewed from a historical perspective. Advances in language options will be reviewed and available AAC device vocabularies and Spanish AAC apps will be described and discussed with reference to specific populations. The discussion will include a review of Spanish vocabularies for Saltillo's TouchChat Suite, Spanish WordPower based vocabularies, Proloquo 4.1's bilingual vocabulary, Unity based vocabularies and AVAZ Español. The advantages of providing AAC users with access to the language of the home are discussed and videotaped conversations with Spanish-speaking parents are included. Culturally appropriate strategies for inclusion of family members in device selection, customization of vocabulary and device training are presented.

    Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to compare and contrast three SpanishAAC vocabularies available for AAC users, name three barriers to successful AAC outcomes in the Spanish-speaking community, describe three strategies helpful in supporting families as they facilitate AAC device across multiple communication contexts and list three considerations in customizing vocabulary for bilingual users.

  • Real-Time Embedded Coaching +

    Click to download handout

    Friday, April 29
    01:30 pm - 03:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 14

    Catherine Creamer, MeD, LSLS Cert. AVEd
    Level of Instruction: Intermediate   -   Joshua Tree II

    This presentation will focus on the specific strategies and techniques of Real-time Embedded Coaching, the process of a person who has specific knowledge or skills coaching a parent or caregiver, a student or another provider during an activity rather than waiting for the activity to be over to provide feedback.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to identify three reasons to use Real-Time Embedded Coaching, identify three strategies that will support Real-Time Embedded Coaching and explain and demonstrate Real-time Embedded Coaching.

  • Transitioning Into the Best Therapist for the Transgender Client +

    Friday, April 29
    01:30 pm - 03:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 16

    Janet Hawley, MS, CCC-SLP
    Level of Instruction: Intermediate   -   Coronado II

    Speech-language pathologists are ideal providers for transgender individuals who want to develop gender-congruent communication behaviors because of our understanding of the mechanics of behavior change, as well as our training in voice, verbal, and non-verbal language. This presentation will include evidence-based and creative approaches to working with these individuals.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to list 5 vocal features to target in voice feminization therapy, compare and contrast male versus female language behaviors and list five stereotypical female and five stereotypical male non-verbal behaviors.

  • Ultrasound Imaging of Swallowing Subsequent to Feeding and Myofunctional Interventions +

    Friday, April 29
    02:15 pm - 02:30 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 17

    Juliet Weinhold, PhD, CCC-SLP; Michelle McKay
    Level of Instruction: Introductory   -   Joshua Tree I

    The purpose of this project was to examine swallowing patterns using ultrasound technology. Ultrasound research in the realm of swallowing is sparse, yet has potential clinical application. In using ultrasound, this study outlines a protocol for utilization of a hand-held probe and reinforces a particular protocol described in the literature. Real-time ultrasound recordings of swallows for 21 adult subjects were made. Baseline swallow patterns were compared to swallows after implementation of one therapeutic intervention common in both feeding and myofunctional therapy, and one intervention more commonly associated with myofunctional therapy.  Changes in swallowing patterns are described, and similarities of interventions across the two professions are discussed.  Participants with oromyofunctional disorder are compared to a group with typical swallowing and differences in ultrasound patterns are described. Analysis includes relative duration of swallowing stages compared to the total duration of the swallow, measurements of tongue height after implementation of the interventions, and the number of swallows required for the bolus to be cleared from the oral cavity.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to identify oral structures on an ultrasound display.

  • Student Health Outreach for Wellness: Health Literacy for the Homeless +

    Friday, April 29
    02:00 pm - 02:15 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 17

    Jean C. Brown, MA, CCC-SLP
    Level of Instruction: Intermediate   -   Tuquoise I & II

    The purpose of this proposal is to present the Student Health Outreach for Wellness Literacy Project. The projects focus is to screen the health literacy & cognitive skills of homeless adults by fostering interprofessional student education and promoting self-advocacy by clients when interacting with their health care providers. A secondary purpose is to recruit speech-language pathologist in the community to undergraduate and graduate students as they interact with other pre-service professionals.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the purpose of the Student Health Outreach for Wellness project.

  • College Athletes, Classrooms, and Concussions +

    Friday, April 29
    01:30 pm - 01:45 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 17

    Shauna Baker, MS, CCC-SLP; Tamiko Azuma, PhD
    Level of Instruction: Intermediate   -   Tuquoise I & II

    Athletes who participate in contact sports have an increased likelihood of experiencing concussions and post-concussive syndrome (PCS). PCS is often associated with attention and memory impairments, which can detrimentally affect academic performance. Specific cognitive consequences of PCS include reduced processing speed, working memory (WM) deficits, and selective, divided, and sustained attention impairments (e.g., Cicerone and Azulay, 2002). These cognitive deficits may be relatively subtle and less noticeable until the individual must perform tasks with high attentional and WM demands, such those required in college classes. In addition to encoding lecture material and monitoring verbal information for notes, a student must also inhibit irrelevant or distracting information. This study examined verbal memory and attention in college athletes with a self-reported history of concussion. Participants learned information in a lecture format and then completed a memory test. They were also administered WM and attention tasks. Analyses focused on assessing the predictive power of those task scores on memory test performance.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to identify academic performance issues in student athletes with a history of concussion, describe how working memory relates to note-taking and lecture test performance and list one way in which to provide accommodations to this population.

  • Comparing Two Children With Speech Deficits and Overlapping Chromosomal Deletions +

    Friday, April 29
    01:45 pm - 02:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 17

    Amna Fares, MS, CCC-SLP; Caitlin Vose, MS, CCC-SLP; Hope Lancaster, PhD; Beate Peter, PhD, CCC-SLP;
    Level of Instruction: Intermediate   -   Tuquoise I & II

    Current research suggests genetic etiologies for a variety of communication disorders. This study investigates the speech patterns of two children with speech sound disorders (SSDs) and overlapping deletions on chromosome 6. We show evidence that the overlapping deletions are associated with specific characteristics of their SSDs and differences in severity.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to have a general understanding of chromosomal deletions, understand the association of chromosomal deletion and speech characteristics and relate the implications of genetic variations to clinical practice.

  • What IDEA Says, What Parents Say, and What it Means +

    ====== Session Canceled ======

    Friday, April 29
    03:30 pm - 05:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 21

  • Clear Speech Production in Real Versus Imagined Noise Conditions +

    Friday, April 29
    03:30 pm - 03:45 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 23

    Alana Baxter, BA; Kate Bunton, PhD, CCC-SLP
    Level of Instruction: Intermediate   -   Tuquoise I & II

    A common recommendation for communication partners of people with hearing loss is to speak clearly, but how effective is this simple instruction? Can clear speech be affected by real or imagined background noise? This study examined the acoustic properties of conversational and clear speech produced under four different conditions. Twelve subjects (8 female, 4 male) with a mean age of 20 years were recorded reading three passages and a set of sentences under four conditions. The first condition for every subject was to read conversationally as though speaking to a friend. In the other three conditions, given in random order, subjects were instructed to speak as clearly as they could while listening to multitalker babble or speech shaped noise over headphones, or imagining that they were in a noisy room.  Acoustic measures reflected rate, frequency, and intensity. Results of this study will inform audiologists and speech language pathologists about whether they are giving helpful instructions related to clear speech production to communication partners of hearing impaired patients.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the importance of clear speech, describe conditions that elicit clear speech production and identify acoustic measures that reflect clear speech production.

  • Applying Learning Theory to the Acquisition of Academic Vocabulary +

    Friday, April 29
    03:45 pm - 04:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 23

    Ashley Bourgoyne, BS
    Level of Instruction: Intermediate   -   Tuquoise I & II

    This study was designed to determine if high-variability visual input would facilitate the development of conceptual representations of academic vocabulary for typical and language-learning disabled college-aged students. Students were trained on vocabulary in high- and low-variability conditions. Their learning was assessed via a posttest which required them to identify, out of a field of four, both trained and novel images. Participants also rated novel images, both accurate and inaccurate, on a scale of 1 to 9 (accurate/inaccurate) in order to assess their conceptual representations of the new vocabulary. Results showed that both typical and language-learning disabled participants were equally accurate on trained and novel items in the high-variability condition, but were less accurate on novel items only in the low-variability condition, though the language-learning disabled participants showed less learning overall. Participants were more successful at rating accurate items in the high-variability condition than the low-variability condition, but were equivalently bad at successfully rating the inaccurate images. High-variability learning conditions may facilitate learner generalization to novel representations and recognition of accurate examples of academic concepts in typical and language-learning disabled college students.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to
    articulate why variability of input might be helpful for learners, identify the benefits of high-variability input on learning and identify the different effects of high-variability input on learning by typical learners vs. individuals with language-learning disabilities.

  • Cochlear Implants: A Team Approach +

    Saturday, April 30
    11:00 am - 12:30 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 34

    Jacqueline Busen, AuD; Kate Helms Tillery, PhD, CCC-SLP
    Level of Instruction: Intermediate   -   Joshua Tree I

    In a recent survey of medical care recipients, 83% of respondents indicated that team-based care improved their health outcomes (jhartfound.org).  Despite this, many allied health professionals work in isolation.  Approaches to coordinated cross-disciplinary care will be discussed, with emphasis on evidence-based management of services for cochlear implant recipients.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the differences between interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary teams, explain the key characteristics of an effective care team, describe how to integrate care for effective management of cochlear implant patients.

  • Color Versus Black and White Picture Naming and Description in Individuals with and without Aphasia +

    Saturday, April 30
    12:45 pm - 01:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 36

    Laura Hook, BA, BS; Emi Isaki, PhD, CCC-SLP
    Level of Instruction: Introductory   -   Joshua Tree I

    Research involving colored stimuli for naming for individuals with acquired anomia has yielded mixed results. This project investigates the use of colored stimuli for naming and language production in individuals with aphasia and matched controls. Clinical implications for assessment will be addressed with respect to the results.

    Learner Outcomes:  The researcher is in the process of gathering and analyzing the data -- learner outcomes TBD.

  • How do I work with an SLPA? +

    Saturday, April 30
    01:30 pm - 03:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 39

    Amy Hill, MA, CCC-SLP; Jeffrey Meeks, EdD, CCC-SLP
    Level of Instruction: Intermediate   -   Tuquoise I & II

    Join us for this session where we discuss obstacles and pose possible solutions to help you effectively work with an SLPA.  With rising caseloads and challenging students we often find ourselves working tirelessly at our jobs.  Working with an SLPA seems like more work, doesnt it?  Let's debunk the myths and talk about the reality including both the pros and cons of using SLPAs. Topics will include licensure requirements and scope of work with examples of how other SLPs have found the use of an SLPA beneficial.  Authorities on SLPA licensure and scope of practice in Arizona will answer the following questions as well as others you may have:  How do I use an SLP/SLPA model to meet speech language needs?  What are the best things an SLPA can assist me with?  How do I keep good communication with my SLPA so we can efficiently meet the demands of a challenging caseload? What are the licensure requirements I need to be aware of? How do I document and provide appropriate supervision? What duties are best delegated to my SLPA? Is my license in jeopardy when I supervise an SLPA?  How do I help my SLPA understand their role?

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the licensure requirements for supervision of an SLPA, list three benefits of using an SLPA and identify what an SLPA can and cannot do per Arizona law.

  • A-A-Ask a P-P-Person Who S-S-Stutters +

    Saturday, April 30
    01:30 pm - 03:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 40

    Judith Eckardt, MS, CCC-SLP
    Level of Instruction: Introductory   -   Joshua Tree II

    Speech and Language Pathologist will have the opportunity to ask questions to a panel of adults who stutter.  These adults range in age from 21- 72 years and function “well” in life.  What has helped them the most? 
    When students train to be speech language pathologists, their exposure to theory of stuttering development and therapy in course work is often very limited. The practicum for stuttering involving observation and practice is also minimal and  students can graduate with no therapy experience. 
    The kind of speech therapy that a person who stutters receives is often based upon the knowledge and training of their speech pathologist. The therapy procedures can focus on fluency shaping and/or fluency modification.   However,  is reduction of percentage of stuttering a measure of success?  Or, is it a point in time measure that could quickly change in other communication situations?  
    It is much more important to determine the “negative effects of stuttering”.  Does your client have negative reactions to his stuttering such as feelings of helplessness, anger, shame, frustration and guilt?  Consequently, the stutterer will develop many avoidance behaviors for different communication situations. Their career choices are often determined by how handicapping they perceive their stuttering to be.  Maybe after hearing this adult panel of people who stutter, Speech Pathologists will begin to change their orientation in goal writing.   Their orientation will focus on helping the clients reduced the “negative experiences” of stuttering with the primary goal being “effective functional communication” with some stuttering.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to state why using “percentage of stuttering”is dangerous in writing IEP Goals, state five possible negative effects of stuttering upon a child or student and write three IEP goals to reduced specific “negative effects of stuttering”.

  • Hearing Loss, Cognition, and Healthy Aging - Part 1 +

    Saturday, April 30
    01:30 pm - 03:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 41

    Nicole Marrone, PhD, CCC-A; Suzanne Moseley, MA; James Shehorn, BS; Elizabeth Glisky, PhD
    Level of Instruction: Intermediate   -   Joshua Tree I

    In this seminar, we will adopt a healthy aging approach to understanding the cognitive and psychosocial consequences of hearing loss with implications for clinical practice in audiology, speech-language pathology, and psychology. There is an increasing public health interest in the connections between acquired hearing loss and health in older adulthood. Older adults with and without hearing loss are at risk for experiencing speech communication difficulties. Declines in cognition, such as with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease, can also negatively impact receptive and expressive communication. These communication challenges are often under-diagnosed and under-managed, which may negatively impact quality of life and health. Collaborative research efforts are beginning to illuminate the associations between hearing loss and various health outcomes including cognition, but a comprehensive model is still lacking.  Although cognitive impairment may contribute to communication problems, it is also likely that hearing loss itself contributes to problems in cognition, via increased cognitive load, changes to brain structure and function, and/or social disengagement. A major question is whether hearing loss is a modifiable risk factor for adverse cognitive and health outcomes. We will review existing and emerging evidence on how hearing loss and cognition are interrelated and consider the implications within the context of illustrative cases. Among the issues to be addressed are common clinical challenges, such as navigating differential diagnosis in a population in which both hearing loss and cognitive impairment are prevalent. Interventions and strategies to support communication, cognition, and psychosocial health throughout older adulthood will be discussed.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to discuss the evidence on the links between hearing loss, cognition, and healthy aging, identify the impact of hearing ability on common tests of cognitive ability and explain how speech language pathologists and audiologists can provide support to older adults with hearing loss and their families.

  • Common Elements in Therapeutic Approaches to Apraxia +

    Click to download handout

    Saturday, April 30
    03:30 pm - 05:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 44

    Barbara Dabul, PhD, CCC-SLP
    Level of Instruction: Intermediate   -   Coronado II

    The motor speech disorder of apraxia has been difficult to remediate in both adults and children. Beyond developing her own therapeutic approach to apraxia(published in 1976), the presenter has spent almost forty years identifying the common elements in successful treatments for apraxia. In this seminar, those elements will be listed, defined and described. They will then be applied to popular treatments and participants will be invited to share treatments they are currently using or planning to use, for examination of the presence of these elements.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to demonstrate the "feel" of apraxia by repeating exercises performed in seminar, list and describe up to ten common elements in successful approaches to apraxia apply the list of elements to at least one common therapeutic approach and assess that approach's potential for success with their client.

  • Guidance Document for School Based SLP/SLTs +

    Saturday, April 30
    03:30 pm - 05:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 45

    Crystal Brooks, MA, CCC-SLP; Mary Keeney, MA, CCC-SLP
    Level of Instruction: Intermediate   -   Tuquoise I & II

    The AZ Department of Education along with several participating SLPs around the state have created a document to provide guidance to those working in the school based setting.  This document will be reviewed, highlighting topic areas addressed and how to use this document to promote the value of the SLP/SLT. Learn more about the special education process, the IDEA, templates to support screenings and intake, evaluations that guide evidence based practice within the IEP, and practices that support the unique cultural and linguistic diversity within AZ. Additional resources are highlighted and discussed.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to understand the purpose of the guidance document, use the guidance document to promote best practice in the school based setting, use the guidance document to promote the value of the SLP/SLT in the school based setting.

  • Realize Language: Using Data Collection to Guide AAC Intervention +

    Saturday, April 30
    03:30 pm - 05:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 46

    LaConda Walker, MA; Jeremy Legaspi, MS, CCC-SLP
    Level of Instruction: Introductory   -   Joshua Tree II

    Creating evidence based goals with augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) users can often be time consuming, confusing, and difficult. Data collection methods exist on AAC systems but often time this data isn’t collected and used to guide therapy plans. Realize Language is a new online service that gives parents and professionals powerful ways to monitor, measure, and maximize a child’s use of an Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) speech device. This course will discuss language development and how to use data collection from AAC device with Realize Language to help guide intervention and develop evidence based goals.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to identify and describe Brown’s five stages and how they relate to the process of goal writing, identify and describe three evidence based instruments to use when conducting a language sample with an AAC user and identify five ways in which Realize Language assists in guiding intervention

  • Hearing Loss, Cognition, and Healthy Aging - Part 2 +

    Saturday, April 30
    03:30 pm - 05:00 pm

    Multi-Interest
    Session 47

    Nicole Marrone, PhD, CCC-A; Suzanne Moseley, MA; James  Shehorn, BS; Elizabeth  Glisky, PhD
    Level of Instruction: Intermediate   -   Joshua Tree I

    In this seminar, we will adopt a healthy aging approach to understanding the cognitive and psychosocial consequences of hearing loss with implications for clinical practice in audiology, speech-language pathology, and psychology. There is an increasing public health interest in the connections between acquired hearing loss and health in older adulthood. Older adults with and without hearing loss are at risk for experiencing speech communication difficulties. Declines in cognition, such as with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease, can also negatively impact receptive and expressive communication. These communication challenges are often under-diagnosed and under-managed, which may negatively impact quality of life and health. Collaborative research efforts are beginning to illuminate the associations between hearing loss and various health outcomes including cognition, but a comprehensive model is still lacking.  Although cognitive impairment may contribute to communication problems, it is also likely that hearing loss itself contributes to problems in cognition, via increased cognitive load, changes to brain structure and function, and/or social disengagement. A major question is whether hearing loss is a modifiable risk factor for adverse cognitive and health outcomes. We will review existing and emerging evidence on how hearing loss and cognition are interrelated and consider the implications within the context of illustrative cases. Among the issues to be addressed are common clinical challenges, such as navigating differential diagnosis in a population in which both hearing loss and cognitive impairment are prevalent. Interventions and strategies to support communication, cognition, and psychosocial health throughout older adulthood will be discussed.

    Learner Outcomes:  At the completion of this presentation, participants will be able to discuss the evidence on the links between hearing loss, cognition, and healthy aging, identify the impact of hearing ability on common tests of cognitive ability and explain how speech language pathologists and audiologists can provide support to older adults with hearing loss and their families.

  • 1

ArSHA Convention Fees

Price includes continental breakfast, morning break, lunch and afternoon break on both days.

Early Bird Registration 2 Days:

  • $225 Member
  • $350 Non-Member
  • 3 or more ArSHA members, same agency, $200/person
  • $100 Student Member
  • $100 Parent (cannot be licensed as SLP/AuD)

Early Bird Registration 1 Day:  Friday -or-  Saturday

  • $175 Member
  • $225 Non-Member
  • 3 or more ArSHA members, same agency, $160/person
  • $50 Student Member
  • $50 Parent (cannot be licensed as SLP/AuD)

Audiology Registration: One day only

  • $95 Audiology

Registration Late Fee (after Wednesday, March 18, 2016)

  • $30 2 Day Registration Late Fee
  • $30 1 Day Registration Late Fee

Hilton El Conquistador Golf and Tennis Resort
10000 N. Oracle Road
Tucson, AZ 85704
By April 1, 2016
1-800-325-7832

A special Convention room rate of $129 for single, double, triple or quad occupancy will be available until April 1, 2016, or until the room block is sold out, whichever occurs first. Be sure to mention the Arizona Speech-Language-Hearing Association in order to receive this rate.

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It’s ArSHA’s time to celebrate!  It’s YOUR time to nominate!

FACT!  The Arizona Speech-Language-Hearing Association has presented MANY awards over the years to recognize deserving individuals and their contributions to ArSHA and the professions of speech-language pathology, audiology, and speech and hearing science. 

FACT!  We have MANY outstanding professionals in our state who have made a significant difference in others’ lives by their work and their professional energies!  

FACT!  ArSHA needs YOU to nominate the most deserving of these professionals so ArSHA can recognize and award their efforts to keep their positive energy flowing!


Tips to get you started!

  1. Look over ArSHA’s awards and think of your colleagues.  Who might be considered for the…
  • HONORS OF THE ASSOCIATION: The highest honor given by ArSHA to a current, active ArSHA member, in recognition of sustained and meritorious service to ArSHA and the profession.
  • AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT: Awarded to those who have made outstanding and sustained contributions to the professions of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, but who are not members or part of the profession.
  • MOLINE MENTORSHIP AWARD: In memory of Marilyn Quintana Moline, this award recognizes a current, Active ArSHA member, who best exemplifies the qualities of a mentor.
  • STATE CLINICAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: An award for recent clinical achievement in conjunction with the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation. (ASHF guidelines)
  1. Download the nomination form in “Honors and Awards” under the Convention tab on the ArSHA website.  Know the intent of the award and the required nomination components.
     
  2. Gather required materials.  Clearly state why you think the nominee is worthy of consideration – focus on what sets them apart from the others.  Describe the outcomes and impact of their contributions.  

 

  1. Forward the nomination form and ALL required materials to:  

Katherine Mahosky, ArSHA Honors Chair                E-Mail:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

                                   

  1. SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Friday, March 24, 2017!

 

It’s ArSHA’s time to celebrate!  It’s YOUR time to nominate!

~Thank you for taking the time to recognize the contributions of your colleagues!~